Monday, February 1, 2016

It's Monday! What are you Reading?

I love talking about books and especially reading what other teachers and librarians are reading.  I get so many good ideas for what to read next from them!  Thank you Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee from Unleashing Readers for coordinating this week after week!

This weekend, I started reading One Crazy Summer.  I only have a little more to go, so I'm hoping to finish it tonight.  I really like the book, and I hope my students will too, but I'm concerned that some may shy away because they don't have enough background knowledge about the turbulent 60's to make sense out of some of the names and events.
But this book has won so many awards I just have to trust that it'll win kids over.  It's a tremendously engaging story of three sisters, abandoned by their mother at a young age, who travel to Oakland, CA to spend a month with her.  At the beginning of the book, it's pretty apparent that she doesn't really want them there, but slowly the oldest one, Delphine - whose character is so beautifully described - works her way into her mother's presence, and her mother finally opens up to her about why she left their father.

I'm also reading The 5th Wave because a student lent me his copy, saying I just "had to" read it.  
And it's okay.  I can see why he liked it because he loves anything SciFi and filled with adventure and this certainly is.  What I like about it is that the aliens are never really described (at least so far.  I know she meets one later on in the novel.)  That gives the story an eerie feel to it, like you don't know who's safe and who's not.  I need to finish it because I have to decide if it's okay to put on my shelf for sixth graders!

The final book that I'm reading is one that I'm purposely savoring.  It's One Thousand Gifts, and it's also one that I'll probably reread once I finish, which is something I almost never do.  Ann Voskamp has so many thoughtful questions about her faith that resonate with me.  I find myself stopping many, many times, just to chew on what she's written.
So how about you?  What are you reading?

6 comments:

  1. I really enjoyed One Crazy Summer as well. I am planning on reading Gone Crazy in Alabama, the Third book in the series, soon. The characters are so great, but you have a point about a possible lack of background knowledge for our students.

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  2. That lack of background knowledge makes historical fic a hard sell in our library. I keep trying, though!

    I enjoyed The 5th Wave. Not the be all end all sci fi but it was fun. Will definitely catch the movie from Redbox, at least. Never got to One Crazy Summer but I did finally read Glory Be (Augusta Scattergood) and enjoyed that one a lot. And The Best Bad Luck I Ever Had. They seem similar.

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    1. I love The Best Bad Luck I Ever Had. I am reading that to one of my classes right now. Historical fiction starts slowly because it has to explain setting but once it gets going, it gains momentum. One Crazy Summer never seems to introduce 60's concepts, just puts them out there. I think that's my concern with it.

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  3. I've been meaning to read One Crazy Summer for the longest time now but haven't really gotten around to it - and now there's three books in the series! I am so behind.

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  4. I have a lit circle set of One Crazy Summer. After kids read it they want to read more about these sisters. Sometimes putting kids in a position where their reading choices are limited, they discover they like many other kinds of writing. I haven't read the second in the series, but I adored the third.

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    1. That's an excellent point, Cheriee. Kids oftentimes surprise me by liking certain books more than I think they will. And the other way around. Maybe I should just let them jump in feet first and see what they think!

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