Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Video Review of A Blind Guide to Stinkville

Way, way, way back in the day when I was in first grade, we switched seats one day and I was placed next to Michael.  Michael had polio, and he wore braces on his legs.  Braces that clanked and made noise. Braces that scared me.  

I began to cry.  My teacher asked me what was wrong, but I was too embarrassed to tell her that I was afraid his polio was contagious.  

She got my older sister, in second grade, to talk to me.  

I couldn't stop crying.

So she moved my seat.

And I stopped crying.

I have felt badly about that for many, many years.  I didn't dislike Michael.  I was scared of his body. If Michael or my teacher had been able to explain his braces to me, it would have removed my fear, and I suspect that I would have been fine sitting next to him.

Have you noticed the number of authors who are tackling difficult topics to teach our students about all people, without making any of them seem scary?  I love how these books make a what could be unapproachable circumstances feel normal (think Wonder or Out of My Mind.)  They remind students (and me!) that each of us is more than what we look or talk - or even learn - like.

A Blind Guide to Stinkville by Beth Vrabel is one of those books.  Alice has albinism, and that means she has to use suntan lotion multiple times a day.  It also means she has nystagmus, so she's considered legally blind.  Here's my review of this book by an author who's becoming one of my favorites!

I have a novel study for this book that you can find in my Teachers Pay Teachers store here.  Read this book to your students!  It will generate a lot of good discussion, and a fair amount of giggles, too. What kid doesn't like a farting dog?

Have a great week!



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